Intercultural Media Academy

Jeremy Iggers
by Jeremy Iggers | Mar 21, 2012
| 1 Comment

Summary:

The Twin Cities Media Alliance’s Intercultural Media Academy will recruit up to 10 participants representing diverse ethnic and religious communities to participate in a 10 week intercultural exchange and training program. During the program, they will improve their media skills, share their stories and stories from their communities, and help each other - and their TCMA instructors - to gain a better understanding of the communications styles and infomation needs of their communities. They will also make social and professional connections with each other and with the larger Twin Cities media community, and develop new ways to share information between communities and with the broader Minnesota public.

The program will include:
* 20 hours of media training and intercultural exchange, led by by Twin Cities Daily Planet editors, guest speakers and TCMA community engagement staff.
* weekly writers groups in which fellows will have the opportunity to workshop articles and news briefs with the Daily Planet editorial staff.
* developing individualized media plans for each participant, appropriate to the information needs of the communities they represent. This can include creating community blogs or websites, contributing to community pages on tcdailyplanet.net or building relationships with existing community media.
Each participant will be expected to devote 100 hours to working on the program. will receive a $1000 stipend and a certificate upon successful completion of the program.

Program participants will be expected to:
* produce weekly news stories, news briefs or commentaries about their communities (appropriate to their skill levels)
* organize at least one event where they share their skills and tools with other members of their community
* participate in the TCMA’s 2012 Fall Media Forum

Founded in 2005, TCMA brings together media professionals and engaged citizens to improve the quality, diversity and accountability of local media.

About You

read more ↓↑ hide↑ hide

About You

First Name

Jeremy

Last Name

Iggers

Country

United States, MN, Hennepin County

City

Minneapolis

Innovation

read more↑ hide↑ hide

Title

Intercultural Media Academy:

What is your best idea to build bonds and work together across cultures and faiths in your community?

The Twin Cities Media Alliance’s Intercultural Media Academy will recruit up to 10 participants representing diverse ethnic and religious communities to participate in a 10 week intercultural exchange and training program. During the program, they will improve their media skills, share their stories and stories from their communities, and help each other - and their TCMA instructors - to gain a better understanding of the communications styles and infomation needs of their communities. They will also make social and professional connections with each other and with the larger Twin Cities media community, and develop new ways to share information between communities and with the broader Minnesota public.
The program will include:
* 20 hours of media training and intercultural exchange, led by by Twin Cities Daily Planet editors, guest speakers and TCMA community engagement staff.
* weekly writers groups in which fellows will have the opportunity to workshop articles and news briefs with the Daily Planet editorial staff.
* developing individualized media plans for each participant, appropriate to the information needs of the communities they represent. This can include creating community blogs or websites, contributing to community pages on tcdailyplanet.net or building relationships with existing community media.
Each participant will be expected to devote 100 hours to working on the program. will receive a $1000 stipend and a certificate upon successful completion of the program.
Program participants will be expected to:
* produce weekly news stories, news briefs or commentaries about their communities (appropriate to their skill levels)
* organize at least one event where they share their skills and tools with other members of their community
* participate in the TCMA’s 2012 Fall Media Forum
Founded in 2005, TCMA brings together media professionals and engaged citizens to improve the quality, diversity and accountability of local media.

Impact and Sustainability

read more↑ hide↑ hide

How will your idea have a positive impact on your community?

Our community, the Twin Cities, is really made up of many smaller communities. And the health of our larger community depends on how well those smaller communties understand each other, and are able to communicate with each other. We can make better decisions about the direction of our common life if everyone is included in the conversation.
The digital revolution has empowered many members of our community with new communications tools that enable them to participate more fully in public life. But not everyone has access to those tools; too often, members of diverse cultural and faith communities are left on the wrong side of the digital divide.
That’s bad for everybody. When some sectors of our community are left out, the richness of the conversation, and our ability to make the best choices as a community are diminished.
This project will provide members of those underserved communities with new media skills, encourage them to share those skills with others, and contribute to a better understanding of their ethnic and religious communities among other Minnesotans.
This project is feasible within a $15,000 budget because the Twin Cities Media Alliance already has the infrastructure to make it work and extensive experience offering free and low-cost citizen journalism classes and media skills workshops. Providing access to media to under-served communities is at the heart of our mission. Our award-winning local news website, the Twin Cities Daily Planet, already publishes more reporting and commentary by ethnic and immigrant writers than any other local publication.
But this project will let us take this work to the next level. The stipends will make it possible to include low-income participants who could not afford to commit so many hours to an unpaid activity. And the 100 hour commitment will enable everyone, including the instructors, to gain a more in-depth understanding of each others’ communities, and develop relationships that can grow over time.

What do you think the lasting effect will be if your idea is implemented?

The lasting impact of our project is captured by that old saying, “Give a man a fish and you have fed him for a day. Teach him to fish and you feed him for a lifetime..” We aim to impart skills that can be developed and built upon during the course of a lifetime. But we aren’t just trying to teach individual men and women how to use the media. One requirement of this project is that each participant organize at least one event in which they share their media skills with other members of their community. Like stories on the Internet, the training and understanding that participants will gain from this project have the capacity to “go viral” - to be shared with many others. It takes thousands or millions of dollars to start a newspaper or magazine, but in the digital media world, the biggest barrier to entry is knowledge. Participants who learn how to write a news story or create a blog or use Twitter as a reporting tool have acquired skills that can be easily shared,
But there is another impact that can be more profound than the acquisition of new media skills. This program is designed as an opportunity for all participants - including the staff of the Twin Cities Daily Planet - to work together and learn from each other. One hundred hours spread out over 10 weeks isn’t a lot of time, but it is an opportunity to build relationships between individuals and communities that also have the capacity to spread and multiply.
Most broadly, the lasting effect will be a richer local media ecology. That may take the form of a more diverse set of voices appearing in community newspapers. Or a new community blog, republished in the Daily Planet that gives immigrants from Ethiopia a new tool to talk to each other and to the rest of us. Or a Somali cultural organization that knows how to use Facebook and Twitter to attract audiences that have never attended one of their events before. But in any event, the result is a more inclusive dialogue and a better-informed public.

Janna Caywood said: I really hope this idea wins. Capacity development of community embedded storytellers and ambassadors really is key, and frankly just ... about this Competition Entry. - 2583 days ago read more >

Jeremy Iggers updated this Competition Entry. - 2600 days ago

Jeremy Iggers updated this Competition Entry. - 2616 days ago

Jeremy Iggers updated this Competition Entry. - 2627 days ago

Jeremy Iggers submitted this idea. - 2627 days ago